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'Westworld': the catchup you need to read before season 2 hits

Early reviews are in, and the "Westworld" season 2 debut appears to have been a rousing success. It officially debuts on April 22 on HBO, and will apparently have a decidedly different look and feel. However, let's take a look back at the pertinent questions from season 1.


Kahron Spearman


First of all, let's recap what Westworld is, considering we had another president when the first season ended.

 

It takes place in an amusement park where the wealthy members of a future society/world we haven't come to know yet pay exorbitant amounts of money to live out their Old West dreams. The town, and area surrounding it, are filled with A.I./humanoid robots, called "hosts." The hosts are treated like toys, used and thrown, then reset for new use. 

After a "glitch" occurs allowing hosts to retain and locate memories an uprising occurs.

 

By the end of season one, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) killed park (and "glitch") creator Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) as a corps of hosts opened fire on the Delos board of directors, including the mysterious Man in Black (Ed Harris). At headquarters, the increasingly powerful host Maeve (Thandie Newton) led a host-driven slaughter of human maintenance employees. 

 

"Their construction and their power source is something we're really going to get into during Season 2," Nolan said, of a process that season 1 left largely undiscussed. "So we'd like to keep that mysterious."

You're getting a much darker version of Dolores this year, that's for sure.

Of the things we know for certain: Dolores and Maeve will be on their missions. The former for some semblance of truth with the uprising. The latter for her daughter, whom she now remembers though it's difficult to ascertain what her "daughter" means because of her A.I.-ness.

 

Most importantly, how will the course of Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) wind up in the new season? After finding he is a host himself, how does he handle his new identity and memories?

SOU  RCES