games

Man on LSD who led police on a car chase thought he was playing 'Grand Theft Auto'

Clark admitted to the drug use and hallucinating to police during interviews. He had initially got into the chase vehicle after getting out of another car nearby.


Kahron Spearman


An Oregon man told police he'd taken LSD and believed he was living a real-life version of the popular video game "Grand Theft Auto" when he stole a car in front of local deputies, and subsequently led them on an over 40-mile-long chase on Saturday, the New York Post reports.

 

A report says two county deputies were anticipating a tow truck to haul away a 2003 Toyota Camry on Oregon 66 and Emigrant Lake Road after arresting the driver on an unrelated drunken driving case.

 

23-year-old Anthony J. Clark walked up to the deputy, told him he was stealing the car, and around 8:25 p.m., he drove off and evading the deputy who ended up being dragged after grabbing and holding onto Clark's shirt in the theft.

He was charged by the Ashland Police Department with recklessly endangering another person, reckless driving, first-degree criminal mischief, attempting to elude an officer in a vehicle, second-degree criminal trespass and unlawful entry into a vehicle. Oregon State Police charged Clark with recklessly endangering another person and third-degree escape.

Ryan Gaydos
Writer, New York Post

Clark sped through the towns of Ashland, Talent, and Phoenix and crashing through chain link fences off the roadway, ran over spike strips twice, and then drove the wrong way down several roads. A patrol car eventually spun him out in Medford.

 

He got out of the car and fled into a mobile home park, but was arrested by police as he was trying to steal another vehicle.

 

Clark admitted to the drug use and hallucinating to police during interviews. He had initially got into the Toyota after getting out of another car nearby.

 

The man is facing a numerous recklessness and endangerment charges from three different law enforcement agencies in Oregon.

SOU  RCES