football

Supreme Court allows sports betting across the country

The ruling will be profound, in immediate terms of sports and contexts yet to be considered. Additionally, there could be a much broader state-rights utilization of the SCOTUS ruling, including non-sports related cases.


Kahron Spearman


In a move that will fundamentally alter both professional and amateur sports, the United States Supreme Court struck down a federal law prohibiting sports gambling. The landmark decision gives states the ability to legalize sports betting.

 

The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PAPSA), a 1992 law that barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions (i.e., Nevada) was nullified, according to ESPN.

Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each State is free to act on its own. Our job is to interpret the law Congress has enacted and decide whether it is consistent with the Constitution. PAPSA is not.


via US Supreme Court's opinion

New Jersey plans to be first to break the gambling ice, with Delaware, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia expected to facilitate legislation for an immediate pathway into bookmaking game, reports the outlet.

 

SCOTUS ruled in favor of New Jersey and capped an almost six-year legal battle, for a now-stricken federal law that the NCAA, NFL, NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball sought to have upheld.

For almost 26 years, only Nevada has been allowed to offer a comprehensive spread of betting options. ESPN reports a record $4.8 billion was wagered at Nevada sportsbooks in 2017 alone.

It stands to reason that tens of billions could be generated nationwide, and also be bolstered by international bettors.

The ruling will be profound, in immediate terms of sports and contexts yet to be considered. Additionally, there could be a much broader state-rights utilization of the SCOTUS ruling, including non-sports related cases.

SOU  RCES