football

Brett Favre reveals multiple rehab stints and Vicodin addiction

It's a candid story that greatly underscores the dangers in the use of NFL doctor-prescribed substances — especially given Brett Favre, of course, was a quarterback, and not a lineman, running back, or an in-the-box defender.


Kahron Spearman


In Peter King's final Monday Morning Quarterback column for Sports Illustrated's website, it was revealed - by the player himself that Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre went to rehab three separate times during his playing career to beat his addictions to painkillers and alcohol.

 

It's a candid story that greatly underscores the dangers in the use of NFL doctor-prescribed substances especially given Favre, of course, was a quarterback, and not a lineman, running back, or an in-the-box defender.

I actually went to rehab three times. I saw the most successful, smart peopledoctors, professional peoplelose it all, ruin their lives. A year or two before you saw me, I went to a place in Rayville, La., just outside Monroe. It was pills then too. Deanna and [agent] Bus [Cook] talked me into it. I didnt think I had a problem, but they talked me into it. I went for 28 days.

Favre told King that during the 1995 season, he consumed 14 Vicodin pills at once. This is the season where he threw for 4,413 yards and 38 touchdowns and was named NFL MVP.

 

"It is really amazing, as I think back, how well I played that year,'' Favre said. "That was an MVP year for me. But that year, when I woke up in the morning, my first thought was, 'I gotta get more pills.'''

"So when I went in the second time, to the place in Kansas, I remember vividly fighting them in there," said Favre, who would evetually be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2016. "They said drinking was the gateway drug for me, and they were right, absolutely right, but I wouldnt admit it. I will never forget one of the nurses. I had it all figured out. I fought with this nurse all the time. I would not admit the drinking problem. At the end she said to me, 'Youll be back.' "

 

"I was back. 1998. Guess who was waiting there when I walked inthat same nurse," he added. "This time it was strictly for drinking. I didnt go back to the pills. I admitted my problem, I was in there 28 days, and it worked."

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