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'Stranger Things' David Harbour talks bipolar disorder: says he was once committed to a mental asylum

"Stranger Things" lovable sheriff David Harbour is opening up about his past battle with bipolar disorder.


Brittany King


David Harbour has battled mental health issues for quite some time, and now he's opening up about all that it entailed. 

 

Via a lengthy interview with Marc Maron for the comedian's WTF podcast, the Stranger Things star discussed his past issues with sobriety and a wide range of mental disorders. 

I've romanticized two things in my life and both have fallen short. One is being in a mental asylum. Really, really not as fun as you think it is. You do have a romantic idea of it and it just ends up being sad and smells like s.

David Harbour
WTF podcast

"Here's the interesting thing, which I've actually never truly spoken about publicly," Harbour said. "I actually was in this Catholicism thing and I was sober for like a year and a half, I was 25, and I actually did have a manic episode and I was diagnosed as bipolar."

 

"I really had like, a bit of a break where I thought I was in connection to some sort of God that I wasnt really in connection to," he continued. "It was like I had all the answers suddenly."

But Harbour wasn't on drugs, he said, "The interesting thing about it was that I realized I dont really need them. That I have a capacity to see the elves in the corners of the room if I really allow myself to go there. So I actually was, by my parents, taken into a mental asylum."

 

Going to a facilty was not easy for the actor. 

 

"I have one thing to say about the mental asylum,” he said. "I've romanticized two things in my life and both have fallen short. One is being in a mental asylum. Really, really not as fun as you think it is. You do have a romantic idea of it and it just ends up being sad and smells like s. And the other thing was boating. I recently went out on a ship in open water, and Id read Moby Dick a million times, and it really is not sexy. Its very similar to the mental asylum experience."

 

"Have you ever been to a mental asylum?" he asked the comedian. "The only thing that defines a 'crazy' person and a 'normal' person because you can seem very normal as a crazy person is they're convinced they're sane. Crazy people are convinced they're sane. It's incredible."

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