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Erika Christensen defends Scientology

Actress Erika Christensen opened up about her experience with Scientology in a new interview with her former "Parenthood" co-star Dax Shephard.


Emily Treadgold


Erika Christensen went on Dax Shepard's podcast, Armchair Expert With Dax Shepard, and talked about her experience with Scientology.

 

She was raised as a Scientologist by her parents and started taking classes at 12 years old. The former Parenthood actress emphasized that she made her own decision when it came to the religion.

 

Christensen explained that Scientology gave her structure growing up while also "fostering independent thought and freedom of personality."

 

"Various things like drinking and drugs and stuff like that, we basically think it's counterproductive," she said. "As the action of Scientology, when you are picking apart the chronology of your life and its effects upon you, it really helps to have that lucidity."

It's kind of what L. Ron Hubbard is saying throughout Dianetics, throughout a lot of his books. He's saying, 'You don't have to believe this, but this keeps happening, so it seems to be true'

Erika Christensen
Armchair Expert With Dax Shepard

"It's almost just selfish on my part; I want to be able to remember everything," the expectant mother said. "I want to be smart, and I want to consider that I'm driving towards my best life."

 

Christensen has a problem with the documentary Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, explaining, "It doesn't have anything to do withanything that I've ever learned about the group or organization. To be specific, if somebody has read a book, read Dianetics or some Scientology book and wants to philosophically tell me what they disagree with, cool."

 

"That is a totally different thing," she continued. "But specifically with that documentary, the documentary was based on a book. They have proved themselves to be irrelevantThere's no relevance in what they're saying."

Christensen thanked Shephard for being open-minded about the interview and emphasized that she wasn't trying to convert anyone.

 

"It's kind of what L. Ron Hubbard is saying throughout Dianetics, throughout a lot of his books," she said. "He's saying, 'You don't have to believe this, but this keeps happening, so it seems to be true' ... because I  know it sounds crazy and a bunch of people that were doing it in 1950 when he wrote the book were like, 'What are you talking about?' And he's like, 'Look, it works when you do it this way.' That's what I'm telling you. You don't have to believe it."

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