basketball

Becky Hammon to change the NBA: what you need to know about the possible 1st woman head coach

Beyond being an assistant under Gregg Popovich in San Antonio, she was All-American at Colorado State, then one of women's basketball's greatest point guards, in the WNBA and internationally. In other words, she has done everything in her basketball career at a high level.


Kahron Spearman


The Milwaukee Bucks interviewed San Antonio Spurs assistant coach Becky Hammon for the franchise's head-coaching vacancy, according to ESPN.

 

She's already the NBA's first female assistant coach, and the first to interview for a head coaching position. However, for whatever reasons, she isn't considered a candidate of significant interest with at least 10 candidates on the Bucks list.

 

The 41-year-old is well respected in league circles and would appear to be a strong fit with the Bucks, but there are doubting whispers in the air.

Its going to take somebody who has some guts, some imagination, and is not driven by old standards and old forms.” He went on, “If somebody is smart, its actually a pretty good marketing dealbut its not about that. Its got to be that shes competent, that shes ready.

Gregg Popovich
Head coach, San Antonio Spurs

To be fair, Milwaukee is shaking trees, bushes and all other foliage - there was even news that 68-year-old former Bulls assistant and Lakers coach Jim Cleamons had an informal conversation about the position. 

 

Beyond being an assistant under Gregg Popovich in San Antonio, she was All-American at Colorado State, then was one of women's basketball's greatest point guards in the WNBA and internationally.

 

In other words, she did everything in her basketball career at a high level.

The problem is that some believe she's effectively skipping the line because the credentials supposedly aren't made of the same stuff as your usual candidate which is a ridiculous argument.

 

Case in point, let's quickly take on the qualifications of Celtics coach Brad Stevens - and strip away his success and venture back to him strictly as a candidate. 

 

He was a great college coach as a mid-major that did make it to national championship games. That's what ultimately got him the job. But he had zero NBA experience which is to say that the Celtics just took a chance and fortunately they hit the lottery. 

 

That's a significant thought because, frankly, the raw odds of the Bucks hiring a Brad Stevens-level of success is slim-to-none.

 

Why not take a shot at Hammon?

SOU  RCES